Suggested Consent Language: CT Scan

Research Integrity

Procedure Language

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Computed Tomography (CT) is a way to make x-ray images of the inside of the body. The CT scanner is a doughnut-shaped machine that uses x-rays to create computer pictures that show structures inside your body more clearly than regular x-ray pictures. During the procedure, a technologist will take you into the CT scan room where you will lie down on the patient table (usually on your back) inside of the CT machine. You should get comfortable because it is very important not to move during certain parts of the test.

CT examinations differ depending on the part of your body being studied. For example, if your abdomen is being studied, a series of pictures will be taken from your lower chest to your lower pelvis. During the study, you will be asked to hold your breath so that the pictures will not be blurred. The machine will make some noise, and the table will move during the scan. Also, you may receive signals from the technologist or from the machine about your breathing. Before or during the study, you may be given an injection of a contrast liquid in your vein to allow the radiologist to obtain clearer images of your organs. If you have any discomfort during the test or after the injection, be sure to tell the technologist.

Risk Language

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Note to Researcher Preparing the Informed Consent If contrast material is used, the risks from the contrast material are serious and need to be included.